Harbor Bar socks

Here is my latest pattern, Harbor Bar, from the new Quince and Co. collection, Socks: Book One. The book contains two other sock patterns, by Michele Wang and Star Athena.

Harbor Bar

Harbor Bar features an unusual stranded colorwork pattern in three colors of Quince and Co. Finch. If you think you’re seeing some of the stranding on the outside of the sock… you’re right. Working the reversed stranding is simple – just flip the sock inside out! These socks feature an afterthought heel instead of my typical heel flap and turn, to show off the contrast heels and toes.

These socks were inspired by one of my husband’s stranded colorwork sweaters (he has surprisingly interesting knitwear for a man) which has a simple geometric pattern. I noticed that I liked the floats on the “wrong side” just as much as the right side of the work.

For Harbor Bar, I’ve combined using colorwork the usual way with “inside out” colorwork where the strands face outward. This gives the fabric a textural component you don’t often see with stranded colorwork. The pattern is a very simple diagonal stripe repeat that is worked the same for the right side and the inside out stripes.

Here’s to trying something a little different with your socks.

6 Responses to “Harbor Bar socks”

  1. get smart says:

    The mysteries of Fair Isle are revealed! 200 Fair Isle Motifs offers simple solutions to the seemingly complex technique of stranded colorwork.

  2. I’ll open by mentioning, as I did in the introductory post for this topic, that all stranded knitting is not Fair Isle, any more than all facial tissues are Kleenex. Technically, Fair Isle-style colorwork is a specific variant of stranded colorwork, as developed on Fair Isle, which is a small island in the North Sea, off the northeast tip of Scotland; it’s generally characterized by a strong horizontal motif, usually composed of thin bands of small designs (called “peeries”) setting off wider bands of more elaborate designs, and it’s usually constructed in the round with unreinforced steeks (if that term doesn’t mean anything to you, hang tight — we’ll get to it) in Shetland or similar wool, with sleeves and collars picked up and knit from the steeked openings. You can see some lovely examples of authentic Fair Isle colorwork, actually produced on Fair Isle, here — note the strong horizontal banding, and the alternating large and small patterns? You can also see a particularly common Fair Isle motif, XO patterning, in several of these sweaters. Scandinavian designs tend to have a slightly different look, with more allover patterning or large sections rather than bands and a slightly different treatment of steeks, if they’re employed at all; some variants are worked all in one piece, often with a round yoke. The world will by no means come to an end if you use “Fair Isle” to refer to all stranded methods, and indeed many people do; however, now if someone snaps at you for calling their beautiful and intricate Bohus sweater “pretty FI,” you’ll have some inkling why.

  3. Sabrina Roth says:

    In this tutorial, we learn how to use a stranded color work pattern. Start with a basic pattern to help you learn how to do this. Use a chart to help you keep track of where you are and what you have done. Use a sticky not over the rows so you don’t get ahead of yourself. Start off with the color that is first, then continue on to do the other colors that are on that row. When finished with this, remove the sticky note and continue onto the other colors that the chart shows. On the first stitch of every row, work the two strands together to anchor it together. When you reach the top, bind your yarn off and you’re finished!

  4. In this tutorial, we learn how to use a stranded color work pattern. Start with a basic pattern to help you learn how to do this. Use a chart to help you keep track of where you are and what you have done. Use a sticky not over the rows so you don’t get ahead of yourself. Start off with the color that is first, then continue on to do the other colors that are on that row. When finished with this, remove the sticky note and continue onto the other colors that the chart shows. On the first stitch of every row, work the two strands together to anchor it together. When you reach the top, bind your yarn off and you’re finished!

  5. In this tutorial, we learn how to use a stranded color work pattern. Start with a basic pattern to help you learn how to do this. Use a chart to help you keep track of where you are and what you have done. Use a sticky not over the rows so you don’t get ahead of yourself. Start off with the color that is first, then continue on to do the other colors that are on that row. When finished with this, remove the sticky note and continue onto the other colors that the chart shows. On the first stitch of every row, work the two strands together to anchor it together. When you reach the top, bind your yarn off and you’re finished!

  6. Visit here says:

    I must say i appreciate you making the effort to generally share this information with us.

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